Home Forums Am I a Fauxtog? okay, deep breath.

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  • #15814

    Powershot A20 has a very short lens:  f/2.8 – 4.8; 5.4mm (Wide angle) – 16.2mm (Telephoto); focusing range:  Normal: 76cm (2.5 ft.) – infinity.  It has a very short focal length and thus, the hyper-focal distance is quite close to the camera.  Everything is in focus.  A dSLR with APS-C sensor like your 60D has a much larger sensor, and much longer lenses (typically).  For my APS-C bodies, I have a 10-20 mm lens.  At 10 mm, the field of view is 90 degrees.  Much wider than the field of view you get from the A20.  The long end of the A20’s lens is still shorter than the short end of the kit lenses that come with APS-C bodies.  As focal lengths get longer, the hyper-focal distance moves further from the camera, and depth of field shrinks if your subject is closer than the hyper-focal distance.   This is a very brief discussion, but there is a lot about depth of field and hyper-focal distance on the Internet.  Some information is better, some worse, but lots available.  Full frame bodies have even bigger sensors, so at the same focal length you can get even closer to your subject so there is even less depth of field for the same framing.

    With respect to http://www.flickr.com/photos/areallifegirl/11427614883/, the groom’s right shoulder is partly out of the frame.  What would have happened if you moved a step or two, maybe three, to your left?

    Those flowers look slightly burned out in the centre?  Are you shooting to raw files?  If so, you should be able to recover that detail.  If not, look up Highlight Priority in your camera manual.  You get much more latitude out of raw files but if there is some reason to avoid raw files, Highlight Priority will help.  The photo would have been helped by some fill flash.  They are squinting and light is not getting into their eye sockets.  As in the other photo, her shoulder and arm seem to be brighter than their faces.  Their faces should be slightly brighter than the rest.

     

    #15815
    cass335
    Member

    So far I agree with what everyone is saying. I should mention that I too have worked (and still temporarily work) in a well known mall studio. I have my own photography business, and the only reason I work in the mall studio is for the extra christmas spending cash….and because they practically begged me to come back and help out for the christmas rush. This is my last year there (which I did say last christmas..lol…but this year I am really done). If you hadn’t mentioned working in a mobile studio, I could have guessed it based on your Alisa album.  =)

    I learned quite a bit about interacting with people through the studio. But it helped me absolutely ZERO when it comes to lighting…camera settings…etc. I learned that from taking a couple college courses on it, and then putting that to work in real life situations. This is what I recommend for you. Working in a mobile studio might be helpful for some things, but it can also make you think you are a great photographer. I know someone who was a manager for 2 different companies in a “mall/mobile” studio. She quit to open her own business, and it was a bust. Because she didn’t know lighting…her camera…etc. Not saying this is you, but based on your photos, you have a lot to learn.

    You specifically asked about this photo:  http://www.flickr.com/photos/areallifegirl/11427614883/

    It needs fill light. Their eyes are very dark. The groom looks very red. (I am not looking at this on a calibrated monitor, but you have to remember that many clients aren’t going to be using calibrated monitors either).  I understand that there were crowds or public, but it looks odd having part of the groom cut off by cropping.  Maybe that could have been avoided by having them stand on the other side of the frame.

    #15816
    fstopper89
    Member

    I would suggest not charging for now… you’re asking for help and critique which shows you understand you have shortcomings and are willing to work towards improving.

    I’ll reiterate what others have said. Most photos are very underexposed and orange/red. To some degree you can fix that in editing, but you should work on getting it right in-camera. The focus issues too. Learn how to set your preferred AF point and use autofocus. Always focus on the subject’s eye. I never use manual focus unless it’s for some close-up still life and occasionally for other things but not generally for portraits. If you’re doing weddings you’ll need a camera that can handle low-light situations well and a fast lens.

    #15832
    nesgran
    Member

    Don’t bother manually focussing with a crop camera, especially not without the high precision focus screen which I’m not even sure the 60D can use. You will never do a better job than the camera unless in certain circumstances.

    If you haven’t get yourself a monitor calibrator device to sort out your wacky colours. Also look at what the screen is, if it is a consumer grade screen with a TN panel you need something better if you are going to be charging people for your services. The wedding pictures have wildly varied colour temp and balance.

    Most of your shots have that 80’s soft focus look, are you using the old canon 135 f2.8 soft focus lens? Anyway, it looks pretty bad.

    You have a fair few problems to sort out before you should take on any more paying clients. All of these issues should have been apparent to yourself before you asked for a critique.

    #15836
    Flea
    Member

    Thanks everyone for your nice words and helpful tips.

    I’m glad that for the most part this forum provides constructive feedback and ways to improve your skill, not simply to shut down and ridicule. After all, I wouldn’t be here if I didn’t want to be better.

    Thanks Cass for knowing where I’m coming from.

    Cheers again all, I will hold off from doing any more paid shoots, which I’ve not really done in while anyway as I don’t pursue it regularly, until I can improve my skill. I’ll stick to being a hobbyist for now, and shoot for friends & family, or volunteer like I do for the Mud Run events and other fundraisers.

    😀

    #15839
    nesgran
    Member

    Thanks everyone for your nice words and helpful tips.

    I’m glad that for the most part this forum provides constructive feedback and ways to improve your skill, not simply to shut down and ridicule. After all, I wouldn’t be here if I didn’t want to be better.

    Thanks Cass for knowing where I’m coming from.

    Cheers again all, I will hold off from doing any more paid shoots, which I’ve not really done in while anyway as I don’t pursue it regularly, until I can improve my skill. I’ll stick to being a hobbyist for now, and shoot for friends & family, or volunteer like I do for the Mud Run events and other fundraisers.

    It makes me very happy to see you being so honest with yourself without getting defensive. It stings getting critique like this but look back at this in a years time, come back and show us how much better you’ve become. See it as a challenge!

Viewing 6 posts - 16 through 21 (of 21 total)
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