Home Forums Am I a Fauxtog? Hoping I'm not a Fauxtog!!

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  • #5795
    crissyB
    Member

    I’ve been in school for photography since Dec 2012. I love photography & it’s something I have a passion for but I doubt myself a lot. Any sessions that I do are COMPLETELY free. Here’s a look at some of my work! My newest sessions are the newborn, the vintage love (found under couples album) & the individuals. I’d like any critique for improvement & some reassurance that I’m possibly not a fauxtog lol! The last pictures all the way at the bottom of my photostream are from July of last year & I can see improvement since then although only two from that long ago are uploaded. Thank you for any feedback!

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/90775278@N02/

    #5800

    I looked at every third or fourth, not much time right now.  Some I really liked, some not so much.  The flower at the end is colourful but focus is not the best.

    Keep shooting.

    #5804
    crissyB
    Member

    Thanks for the feedback! 🙂

    #5826
    fstopper89
    Member

    You don’t have a lot on there, but I will say I like some of the poses, but I don’t care for the composition. Some are just shot too tight with no “white space” or much background showing… which can be a very powerful part of the photo. The focus is mostly good. However some look over-sharpened when you edited them. You’re not a fauxtog if you’re not charging, but you don’t look quite ready to be in business yet. I think you’re headed in the right direction, especially if you are in school (main fauxtog pattern is “Hey I got a camera, let me charge you $50 to shoot your wedding!”) Lol. Even after I went through school though, and had some experience, I look back on my first few paid shoots and I’m not very happy. I should have done more free practice shoots I think, I mean they weren’t fauxtog kind of photos, but I improved greatly with a little more practice and especially after I had job experience working for another photographer. When you get to a point where you can produce consistent, solid work, where it’s evident that you know how to use your camera equipment and editing equipment properly, that may be the time to consider going into business.

    #5828
    crissyB
    Member

    Thanks for the feedback! I struggle with composition a lot but I’ll be getting into that subject more in depth in a few weeks with my courses! I’m hoping to soak it up & improve from it.  Funny that you mention that because everytime I try to go for more background which I personally prefer, I get the complaint of needing to crop tighter & get the subject to fill the frame. I’m thinking I may need to ignore that & go with my own preference. I’m clearly still in the process of discovering my own style. Everytime I look back at past work, I see improvements then pick the old ones apart along with the new ones lol! It’s all about improving & getting better! Thanks for the feedback though, I appreciate it!

    #5829
    fstopper89
    Member

    There’s a balance you have to find between too much white (negative) space and not enough. Some images you should fill the frame. It’s good to experiment with both; take a photo of the same subject with no background (even cutting into the subject), one with very little, and one with more background. Have others critique this in class. Keep in mind in your composition, try to stick with the rule of thirds at the beginning. As you go along you will find good ways to break this rule.

    #5831
    crissyB
    Member

    Thanks! I definately need to find a balance. 🙂 How about colors? Does the coloring of my photos look okay? Does it need more pop or anything? Finding good color balance is another issue I’m having. I tend to go for understaturation vs oversaturation so sometimes I think my photos tend to lack color.

    #5834
    fstopper89
    Member

    Your saturation is pretty decent. However some look a bit overexposed, especially in the light-skinned faces. Try bracketing, which is taking a few photos of the same pose, one with your light meter reading at 0, one a stop below, and one a stop above. It will help you find where it looks best. You should also be using selective focus points if you are using autofocus on your camera. Forgive me if this is a little advanced, I do need to know if you’re using a DSLR for that to make sense. When  you use selective focus points, focus on their face, especially their eyes. This will also help your light meter read correctly for their skin.

    Here are some of my own examples of filling the frame vs. using negative space to your advantage.

    Negative space, with subject off-center: http://www.flickr.com/photos/roxanne_elise_photography/8225598305/in/photostream

    Negative space, not too much background, but enough to help create the setting: http://www.flickr.com/photos/roxanne_elise_photography/8111653230/in/photostream

    Filling the frame: http://www.flickr.com/photos/roxanne_elise_photography/8005388698/in/photostream (Creates more “dynamic tension” which pulls your eyes to different ends of the image- this is more useful in action shots)

    Filling the frame: http://www.flickr.com/photos/roxanne_elise_photography/7861429636/in/photostream

    Almost filling the frame: http://www.flickr.com/photos/roxanne_elise_photography/7928198598/in/photostream

    But remember, just because I shot these particular images this way, doesn’t mean it is the only “right” way to do it. Would my first image look ok cropped in closer like a headshot? Yeah probably. Would my basketball guy look fine with more background showing? Maybe.

    #5842
    crissyB
    Member

    Thanks! Nope I know all those terms. I recently upgraded to a Canon 60D which has spot metering whereas my Canon rebel didn’t so I’m learning how to use it properly! Thanks for the examples! They help a lot!!

    #5844
    dont.care
    Member

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    #5846
    crissyB
    Member

    I’m still currently in the process of making it my own & finding my own style. I do like feedback & opinions to see how others perceive my work, nothing wrong with that. If there are things I don’t like about my editing or end result, someones tips could add that little bit of flare my photos may be lacking.

    #5848
    fstopper89
    Member

    Before you break the rules (creatively or not) you should learn them. Rules in art are meant to be bent or broken, but you should have a reason to do so. (Entire image not in focus? Reason? “Uh, I bumped my camera and accidentally pressed the shutter release. I call that art.” No, that’s not art.) One should, and must, learn the basics first. 1) The science, bare-bones, technology of how to use the camera and it’s functions. 2) Artistic elements like composition, light, color, lines and angles, visual weight, framing, etc. 3) How to use digital software correctly in conjunction with the camera. You can’t just pick up 20 grand worth of equipment and expect to make great art. No, this site is not a college professor. Most of us on here however have had formal education and/or experience to back up what we’re saying, and by no means, are any of us perfect photographers. Many of us, myself included, have an extensive art background in school, besides photography. It all helps. You can learn how to use your camera and lenses correctly, but your images can still be completely lackluster, even if they’re in perfect focus, have perfect white balance, and perfectly exposed. The way a person views art depends on their own tastes and life experiences. No two people are going to like a piece for the same reasons. Once you can understand the art behind photography alongside the science behind it, you SHOULD put your own creative spin on it!

    #5849
    IHF
    Member

    Ajay,

    The stuff that pops up on the main page is liked by the client, and obviously liked by the tog that took them, as they are proudly displayed in their portfolios.  There is much much more to being a professional photographer than that.  If it were that easy, than everyone would do it…hummmmm… Kinda why YANAP got started in the first place, isn’t it?

    while I do agree with what you are saying to a certain extent if it was solely addressing photographic “art”.But we are also talking a professional service here.  To be a successful tog in this genre, your work  needs to have mass appeal, and for most (if not all) hired gigs, they also need to be technically sound. In order to have mass appeal, yes, rules need to be followed and/or broken knowledgeably.  In order to record a wedding day, or other important event your work needs to be technically sound.  Sure, she will move on to create her own unique style, but to do this successfully you need to have the foundations, and yes,  an understanding of the RULES firmly behind your belt.

    and I believe no one here ever called this photographer a fauxtog.  It’s obvious she cares about what she is doing, and it’s very important to her.  She’s an amateur , that aspires to go pro.  There is absolutely no shame in that, or in her learning process.  She’s got this!!

    #5850
    dont.care
    Member

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    #5851
    dont.care
    Member

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