Home Forums Am I a Fauxtog? CC Please

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  • #4666
    eecoleman09
    Member

    Ok, so I don’t really care if I’m a fauxtog or not.  I just thouroughly enjoy photography and people.  All these photos are friends or family. Please give me some constructive critism.  My skin tones bother me a lot because they just don’t seem right to me for some reason, so if anybody has anything specific to say about them, that would be great.  Also, I know I tilt the camera A LOT.  Is it so bad?

    Thanks,
    Erin

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/52473148@N05/

    #4670
    WildAtHeart
    Member

    The angles are killing me.  I really dislike when a photo is purposely tilted for “creativity”.  Horizons should be straight.  If they are sitting on a hill, you will be able to tell it is a hill.  There is no need to twist and turn photos.

    #4672

    The pictures aren’t terrible but they aren’t good either.  The tilt or “dutch” is ridiculous.  Just stop.  I should’t have to turn my head just so i can look at a picture oriented correctly.  The skin tones look fine to me though.

    #4679

    A local pro recommends tilting the camera to fit in a building or sailboat’s mast that otherwise will not fit with the lens you have.  And he recommends tilting some other photos for creative effect.  His specialty is lighting with speedlights and his advice about that is much better.  If you are going to tilt, make it look like you meant it, as you have, but keep the technique for a few special photos.  Don’t use it for almost every photo.  When you take a tilted photo, take a straight one either just before or just after, so you can compare.

    A couple of your photos look slightly over exposed.  This may be your problem with skin tones.  Or, your monitor may not be calibrated.  Notebooks are worst, thin panel desk monitors are next and the great big old cathode ray tube monitors were best.  Thin panels and notebook monitors must be viewed almost exactly straight on.  Manufacturers seem to be trying to improve and some can be viewed from the side without loosing a lot of light but, if you view from above, the image displayed goes lighter and if you view from below it goes darker.  Ambient light affects your viewing experience so pay attention to room light.  Pick up a Spyder or Colormunki that can profile your monitor and create a file for the computer to use to better display correct colours.

    #4691
    eecoleman09
    Member

    Thank yall.  I actually went to a workshop, that was kinda expensive, a couple years ago.  It was held by two photographers from the Atlanta, GA area.  They recomended tilting the camera a lot.  However, I agree, I might do it too much! My hands just go that way! Woops.  I do have a Spyder calibration system.  I have the Spyder 3 Express.  I can’t remember to do it though! I should set an alarm for myself, or something once a month.  Thanks again!

    #4695
    creyes8519
    Member

    You had some really awesome shots that were ruined with the tilt.  I’m guilty of ruining my shots with tilts as well.  Just stop them altogether and maybe just throw in one.    Some shots IMO were too close.  But everything else is very good.  Just top tilting and you should be good to go.

    #4708
    Nightrose
    Member

    Creyes is right…lose the tilt and your photos will be great. Tilting hurts my eyes (and neck!).

    #4719
    fstopper89
    Member

    Your work demonstrates good technical knowledge of your camera and editing software. They’re sharp, in focus, skin tones look mostly accurate, and they’re not by any means over-edited. Nice clean edits. A few look a bit overexposed in the highlights, but it’s something that can usually be adjusted slightly in Lightroom. However I agree on the too frequent use of tilt. I’m guilty of tilting a lot too, but if I were to compare, yours are a bit too-tilted. A lot of horizons are at harsh 45-degree angles. It’s not terrible, but I think a lot of those images could have stood no tilt or just a slight tilt, and the tilting is to the point of being distracting. I know where you’re coming from though, a lot of pros I know use the tilt for a dynamic effect, and some critique of my use of tilt has made me think twice of where I should and should not use it. I’m not going to stop tilting either, I’m just going to be more picky about when I use it, and I think your situation is similar.

    Here’s my photostream. http://www.flickr.com/photos/roxanne_elise_photography/

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