Home Forums Main YANAP Discussion Forum camera reviews: what's best for the job?

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  • #23218
    braixenlayne
    Member

    Hello All,

     

    I am looking into cameras that work well for newborn/senior/family sessions. Also, lens preference would be nice to hear, too. I’m not looking to move into Wedding for many, many years, so I don’t need recommendations on that.

     

    Also, I’ve been looking for anyone who has had experience with the Canon EOS 50d.

     

    Thank you all for your help and advice.

    #23219
    Don
    Member

    Take some classes first. Seriously. I can tell by the question that you know nothing about photography.

    #23221
    emf
    Member

    I’m only amateur but, lens-wise, I have a few prime lenses, 24, 35, 50, 60, 85  but for me my favourite for newborns/families is my 28 -70 f/2.8  zoom- the slightly poorer cousin of the 24-70.  It’s still a really great lens and though I like primes, for family/kid portraits it’s nice to have the flexibility and instantaneity of varied focal lengths, especially for faster moving toddlers!  I also use my 60mm micro for any close ups of little hands and feet for newborns, though this is a great lens too and I mainly use it for straight up portraits, if I’m not using my zoom – it is very sharp though so can show a bit too much – especially on female subjects – who don’t necessarily want to see every pore!

    If you are only just starting and don’t have much budget though, the 50 f/1.4 of even the even cheaper f1.8 is a a good place to start.

     

    #23225
    nesgran
    Member

    Don has a point, if you are wondering about the very basics asking if a fairly quirky five year old camera would be a good choice you are starting off in the wrong end. By all means the 50D is a competent camera but hardly my first choice. I’m guessing from your suggested body your budget is pretty tight. If that is the case I’d look at either a canon 5D (the original 12mpix version), Canon 7D (original 18mpix version), canon 1Ds MkII, Canon 1D MkIII, Canon 70D or 6D. Out of that lot a used 6D would be my choice but most expensive. All the listed cameras will be competent enough if you know what you are doing and several a couple of generations old pro-bodies and they are listed roughly by ascending price on the used market. As for Nikon I don’t know to be honest as I don’t know them so well. The Nikon D300s is always a favourite as is the D7100. Nikons D600 will win on price/performance ratio as they have cannonballed in value after the scandals with dirty sensors and a replacement coming out.

    Lens will get a lot more difficult as that will depend on the body but if you get a full frame camera a 24-70 f2.8 lens would be the obvious choice. Combine with canons excellent 85mm 1.8 or 135mm f2 and you have a solid package. After that you should think about spending twice as much as you did on body and lens to get a good light set up.

    If you were looking for encouragement to start up a facebook photography business without any experience you have landed in the wrong forum I’m afraid.

    #23226
    braixenlayne
    Member

    Hi everyone,

     

    Thank you for your responses. However, I currently own a Canon 6d and wanted to know more about the 5d Marks II (I know, discontinued) or the Canon 5d Marks III. (I guess I should have included that.) I am not attempting to be started as a professional. I currently work under another photographer who is considered one of the best in this town. I’ve been doing that for 3 years now ans taking some online classes. (I left my question so open because I wasn’t sure what direction to gear my thoughts towards. Lenses on the other hand, I do get lost a little there.)

     

    Finally, my hubby is a hobiest and his uncle just handed him down his canon 50d and I have never worked with it and it as hoping I could also acquire some information about how one liked it.

     

    Thank you.

    #23228

    A 5D Mk III and 6D have different strengths.  The 6D is said to be a little better in low light while the 5D Mk III has better auto-focus.  Usually the 6D is less expensive to purchase.  There are lots of comparison tools on the net.

    Auto-focus was a major upgrade from 5D Mk II to Mk III.

    The 50D is in the middle of a line of great bodies starting with the 10D and progressing through the 70D.  Unlike the 6D, 5D and 1D variations, you can use EF-S lenses with the 50D.  You can also use all the full frame lenses, and a wide range of third party lenses, too.

    Lens choice varies based on lots of factors.  Longer lenses compress the scene which keeps noses smaller looking, but if you are shooting an open event like a Christening or Baptism, or a Bar Mitzvah  or Bat Mitzvah, where all the participants are apt to have cell phone cameras or P&S, a short lens is a good choice so you can get as close as all of them, otherwise you will be shooting their backs.  If you are using lighting, fast lenses are not so important.  If you are using ambient light in a church or house, a fast lens may work better at the expense of depth of field.

    All of this has been extremely generalized.  There is a lot of gear, a lot of science, and many methods available to achieve similar results.  Classes and practice in the field are good ways to sort out what works for you.  But, if you have specific questions, don’t hesitate to ask, here, as well.

     

    #23253
    Don
    Member

    If you have a 6D, there really is no reason to even think about using a 50D. Again, take some classes. This is basic stuff. If you don’t know even know what your camera can do, you’re really not ready to even shoot events for free.

     

    Which means I fully expect to see a Facebook page with lots of bad photos at some point in the near future. Just another momtog with a $2000 camera.

    #23259

    If you have a 6D, there really is no reason to even think about using a 50D.

    I have a 5D Mk III, and I still use a 30D and frequently use a 550D.  There are times you don’t need full frame and lenses made for APS-C are smaller and lighter than more-or-less equivalent full frame lenses.

    You can use any lens that fits a 6D with a 50D, so try it out and see what you can do with it!

    #23306
    IHF
    Member

    I’m with Don.

    I guarantee theres an S and B studios Facebook Photography page out there that just launched.  Couple this post with the pictures offered for critique by OP in another post, and the Christmas Minis question… Doesn’t seem to be a person who has interned/been mentored and took classes for three years.  More like someone who just got a camera and thought “Hey!  This is fun.  I’m going to ask people to pay me, and call myself a photographer”.  Sorry OP just being honest.  If it’s not the case, and I’m way off, I think you may want to look for a new mentor because they don’t seem to be helping you much.  I just can’t imagine assisting a photographer and still not knowing what lenses I want/need or what camera would suit my needs best.  Just doesn’t seem legit to me at all

    #23333
    EyeDocPhotog
    Member

    Your questions seem a tad disjointed and smack of an apparent lack of basic photo concepts (ie., asking about the utility / functionality of a 50D when you’re already in possession of 6D implies your fundamental photographic skills may need quite a bit of remediation). The analogy which jumped immediately to mind is the ‘experienced plumber’ in a supply store asking a clerk “I’ve used Snap-On tools for years, but I was wondering if you could tell me a little more about this Craftsman set here…?” I think a seasoned clerk in the shop would have a bewildered look on his face at this point.

    All the above notwithstanding, I refer you to the following 228-page PDF link of the 50D user manual:

    http://www.canon.ca/support_images/RightNow_Images/Digital_Camera/eos50d-h-en.pdf

    Read it in its entirety, then go back and read it again. Then perhaps read it a 3rd time, this time with the camera in your hands testing out the various buttons, settings, and menus.

    I have a 50D, and I love it. I also have a 1Dx, which I’ve said time and again if I knew before what I know now, I NEVER would have bought the 1Dx because I don’t shoot weddings or nighttime NFL games and have no need for the super high ISO performance. The 6.3 fps of the 50D is usually just fine for me for action and I LOVE that the crop sensor gives me 1.6x longer reach. I have all L Canon glass: 50mm f1.2, 85mm f1.2, 24-105 f4, 70-200 f2.8, and one Sigma lens, 18-250 f3.5-6.3.

    I love the durable magnesium alloy body, weather sealing, the nice feel of the jog-wheel on the back, everything. It’s a great camera. BUT, the lenses I have are the investment, not the bodies – bodies lose value quite rapidly. ALREADY, the 7D Mark II gives the 1Dx s run for it’s money at 1/4 the price – and several pro sports photogs are raving that the crop sensor, 10fps and almost ‘mind-reading’ focusing system borrowed from the 1Dx makes it the camera to consider for pro sports.

    Read. Shoot. Learn. Then invest.

    #23369
    MJWC1
    Member

    If you work under a skilled and experienced photographer, why not ask for their advice on equipment??

    #23377

    I agree with MJWC1.  Seems kinda fishy that after 3 years of working with a professional who is supposedly regarded as “one of the best in this town,” you have acquired no knowledge or skill from said photographer.  In addition to acquiring nothing from this photographer, you apparently are not benefiting from the online classes you said you are taking.  And how is it even remotely possible that you don’t know anything about lenses??!?

    Basically this is what I get from the OP:  I just got this 50D and I started a “business” page on Facebook, but then I saw this website and I’m afraid I’ll end up on here one day, please tell me that this equipment is OK so I can feel better about charging people for the crap I churn out.

    Too harsh?  Too bad.

    #23389
    IHF
    Member

    I decided to investigate a little and look up the this poster’s page/online info, mostly because I don’t like getting lied to. I won’t post links here because that seems unfair, and kind of mean. Two wrongs don’t make a right and all that jazz.

    Sure enough she has a FB page that just opened mid November, and she “specializes in senior, portrait, family and newborn photography”.
    Her 6D just arrived on the 10th, and right now she’s offering mini sessions from $35 to $75 (no regular prices posted).

    From her mini session post here at YANAP: “I work for a well known professional photographer in my town and he’s allowing me to use studio space. (These sessions are completely free but is also requesting donations for the domestic violence shelter in my town in exchange for photos. Again, I am not making a profit”.

    No mention of donations or the “well known professional photographer that’s considered the best in town” on her business page. Just some cute package names and price lists and “book now” reminders.

    No surprise, but not registered or licensed or any of that jazz either

    In her defense, it looks as though she’s been at this longer than just mid November. She had another photography page in the past that’s no longer up, so it looks as though this could be her second attempt

    Look Braixten,
    I have no problem with you learning photography and being really excited about it. We all get that. I even don’t have too much of a problem with you being “in business”, but the dishonesty makes me really uncomfortable. Why not be completely honest with your audience/potential clients and friends and family. Why not be completely honest with people you seek help from? It will serve you better, and help any sort of future business you might hope to have. I much rather be told I’m a lousy photographer, or a horrible business person AKA fauxtographer, than be called a liar, delusional, full of … or any sort of negative personality flaw that could potentially make people distrust me. Be honest with yourself, and with others. It will get you so much further than faking it until you make it, or any sort of pretending or covering up will.

    keep shooting, be humble and honest (maybe study the business side of things a little before jumping in any deeper. Insurance, taxes, pricing, cost of doing business etc) and you’ll do just fine. Take care, slow down there’s no race
    Or ignore everything I said and embrace being a fauxtographer until something better comes along. No biggy.

    #23413
    Don
    Member

    LOL you said insurance. Not like any of these fauxs ever even THINK of buying insurance.

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