Home Forums Am I a Fauxtog? Am I bad at photography?

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  • #19645
    #19652
    EyeDocPhotog
    Member

    I’m fifteen and just starting out but I wanted to know if I have ANY talent

    This may come as a shock, but almost all people who you may have judged as having an innate ability to perform some technical skill (WITHOUT any prior formal training) have indeed LEARNED how to become masters at what they do. We often see great artwork and think to ourselves “wow, they’re talented,” thinking that there was very little (or perhaps NO) preparation before the ‘great masterpiece’ was unveiled. Nothing can be further from the truth.

    The fact that you’re taking the first steps at your age to explore the camera and your abilities with it is a fine beginning. Learn more of the art (yes, it IS learned) and explore the ‘rules’ of photography and get them down pat. Then learn for yourself how and when to break the rules.

    This whole process is likely to take years, but the fun is in the journey, looking back at your photos to see how you’ve evolved.

    Keep shooting. You’re doing fine!  🙂

     

    #19657

    Thank you so much!! 😀 I’m gonna keep going and keep taking pictures. 🙂

    #19658
    EyeDocPhotog
    Member

    a great place to start looking for techniques and tutorials is this site

    http://digital-photography-school.com/

    or this one

    http://www.cambridgeincolour.com/

    Both provide simplified explanations to complex photography topics and – when you’re ready – more detailed, advanced tutorials as you learn how to implement the techniques.

    HOWEVER, start your travels with your camera’s user manual. So few starting photogs do this. It can teach you a great deal – read it again and again. Know your camera inside and out, and become familiar with every function even if you don’t have use for it now. As you climb the ladder, you’ll be glad you did!

    #19659

    This may come as a shock, but almost all people who you may have judged as having an innate ability to perform some technical skill (WITHOUT any prior formal training) have indeed LEARNED how to become masters at what they do. We often see great artwork and think to ourselves “wow, they’re talented,” thinking that there was very little (or perhaps NO) preparation before the ‘great masterpiece’ was unveiled. Nothing can be further from the truth.

    OK!  I’m shocked!

    The first definition of “talent” is:  a special natural ability or aptitude.   The second definition is: a capacity for achievement or success; ability: young men of talent.  … which could be viewed as the “capacity” is caused by education.

    Over the years I have met lots of people.  Some have been extremely good at what they were studying, or at their job, others have been mediocre even after extensive training.  I think the difference is talent or aptitude.  I think you can find examples of  the same thing in almost any field.  In the art world it may be even more prevalent because a good picture can be created from knowledge but a great picture also needs to be created from “heart”.

    Someone with aptitude will absorb a lot of knowledge through osmosis, just by being exposed.  They will seem quite talented without having been formally trained and will be able to make leaps of faith that work out.  They will be good without formal training and even better with the right training.

     

    A note to Madison:

    I like your photos, too, and think you have talent which can be further improved by both directed and undirected study.  Whether you want to do photography as a career or just as a hobby, I think you are going in the right direction and will be able to progress further.  Best wishes.

     

    #19662
    EyeDocPhotog
    Member

    Some have been extremely good at what they were studying, or at their job, others have been mediocre even after extensive training.

    Then the training was not appropriately applied or supervised.

    #19663
    emf
    Member

    Then the training was not appropriately applied or supervised.

    Not necessarily, the student has to take some responsibility for their learning.

    #19665

    Then the training was not appropriately applied or supervised.

    Could be.  I want to congratulate your professors on graduating a class that all scored 100% in each of their courses!

    #19666
    alisamer
    Member

    Madison – I agree that you seem to have potential, and that learning your camera inside and out while also training your eye will help you go far!

    While I think that a great deal can be learned and hard work can trump talent, I’m not sure I agree 100% that talent has no effect. There has to be some self-awareness at the very least if the talent isn’t there, if that makes sense. For example I personally know someone who has been working on learning a musical instrument very hard, with very good teachers, for nearly 30 years, and is just slightly better than the 2nd graders I know working on the same thing for less than 3 years. Part of the issue is she thinks she’s really good, and can’t recognize her own mistakes, even when they are pointed out to her. Combined with a lack of innate talent, she just never improves. If she had the talent, she’d do better. If she could recognize her mistakes, she’d do better. Gotta have one of the two! I think that may be part of the issue with some “fauxtographers” – they think they’re better than they are so are unable to see their mistakes or shortcomings.

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