Home Forums Am I a Fauxtog? Aaannnnnd go.

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  • #3991
    pigboo22
    Member

    Curious, I am slowly getting better. Im saving for better equipment. I cant wait!

     

    http://www.facebook.com/pbphotography.mi

     

    Thanks.

    #3996

    I have a couple of questions first.  What equipment are you using now?  What editing software are you using?  My honest opinion is that you “spray and pray”.  Taking 500 pictures at a family portrait shoot is insane.  You cant seriously consider being a pro and making decent money if you have to dig through that many pictures.  I also think you pay more attention to editing than you do composition and focus.  Every session has multiple editing styles and most of them are just faddish.  You have some decent shots, but I think any parent with a DSLR could get those same shots.  Im not trying to be mean at all, but you should consider reading more and really focusing on getting better.  The main problems I have with your pictures are bad lighting, dark eyes, unfocused pictures, too many/bad editing styles.

    #3999

    I do not need to look at your photos to know that you are a fauxtographer. This line in your about sums it up.

    “I don’t believe in charging double what I pay (ie 15$ for a 5×7) I don’t like the idea of it. So you will get a disc, and you will have free reign to do what you want with them and get them printed where you want. (If you do need help on where to go for specialty prints, I am more than happy to help)  ”

    You also will never be able to do this for a living with this mindset. When a photogrpaher charges $ 15.00 for a 5×7 the customer is not paying for the printing charge. They are paying for an image, a memory, a moment that was captured. The time it took to learn the skill to capture it. The time it took to edit it correctly to have the best print possible. The equipment to capture the image. To me that seems a small price to pay.  You are the very epitome of a fuaxtographer. You think your skill, knowledge, time and equiment cost bring no value to the customer. So when you save enough for better equipment and have to recover the thousands of dollars invested, I guess you will feel the same. Every Click of the shutter is also one click closer to the death of the camera and a costly repair… Still thinking that $ 15.00 for a 5 x 7 is to much to pay?

    #4012
    creyes8519
    Member

    Well, I looked at your photos… I think you have some really excellent shots.  Don’t edit so much where you lose detail.

    http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=473720682653174&set=a.473720599319849.112183.130612303630682&type=3&theater

    ^^ Example of a cute shot where the editing did not do it justice.

    Also, learn to be a little picky when choosing your shots to post on FB or your website.  For example

    http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=488416914516884&set=a.488416854516890.116023.130612303630682&type=3&theater

    vs.

    http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=488416987850210&set=a.488416854516890.116023.130612303630682&type=3&theater

    First shot is cute, nice composition, nice catch-lights in the eyes, WB is OK (again, not digging the editing).  Second shot, too much color cast on the RS of his face, eyes are dark, hand is cut off… not a TERRIBLE shot but if I took it I would not have added it to my FB.

    This one….

    http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=486325178059391&set=a.486325041392738.115604.130612303630682&type=3&theater

    You’re focused on her cap, not her eyes.  I would toss it.

    Also you mention your equipment.  I am currently shooting with a Nikon D3100 (I’m not a pro, mind you).  I make it work.  I avoid using a high ISO whenever possible.  The highest I’ll go is ISO 400 and if I must 800.  The D3100 starts getting a little noisy at 400, is bad at 800 and is god-awful at 1600.   Even if you try and correct the noise, it will make you lose detail which sucks.   I notice a lot of your indoor shots have this problem with I can assume is because you have the same problem as me and you need a better camera.   Either that or you are shooting on Auto…. when I use the Auto setting I notice that it seems to use higher ISOs.  Do your research if it is your camera… if you want to do events like birthday parties your are going to need to get the right camera for your business.  Go to Snapsort.com before you buy your new camera and compare and really pick the right one.

    I will not tell you how to run your business.  Just because you give your photos to your clients on a CD for them to print on their own does not make you a Fauxtographer.  A fauxtographer, to me, is someone that I would not pay to take pictures of my family.  Your photos are good enough where I would pay.  To me it seems like you are offering affordable prices that are appropriate for your level of skill, experience, and resources.

    Overall, good job.  Just keep asking for advice and listen to the more experienced photographers and you should be on the right track.

    #4017
    pigboo22
    Member

    Thank you for your honest opinions! Maybe I should have explained more. I am used a Canon 30d that is one its last leg, so Im saving to get something better, with a better lens. I have pretty much learned from doing and trail and error. Ive only been doing this by myself for a year. I used to work in a portrait studio, which ruined my love for it (it has since come back) then I worked with a HORRIBLE (didnt know at the time) business woman and photographer. I assistanted her and edited for her. So i learned and adapted to her style. I have since moved on from that, and have been trying to edit less and less (last year everything was way more yellow)

    Is that the over edited? The yellowish tones? I do admit I use lightroom and use presets, then adjust them how i want. Ive been trying to get away from this. I

    And I know I have trouble focusing sometimes.  I am trying to learn how to use my settings better. I do NOT use auto. Fuck that.

     

    And to notaphotographer, thanks for taking a look. Just because I don’t charge for prints doesnt make me automatically a faux. Its because I am a mom, and I work full time. THEN do this. I do not have a studio. To be honest, it is easier for me to not have to order prints. I’ve done that before. This makes them happier, and me as well. This isn’t my full income, I’m not looking to make a living. I do it because I love it, and I want people to get something better than going to a cookie cutter studio. This doesn’t make me a faux. Yes I am saving up for better camera and lenses. It will come in time. The photosessions are for that.

    Thank you! Im really going to take what has been said to heart and work harder to just get better and better.

    #4018

    “Just because I don’t charge for prints doesnt make me automatically a faux. Its because I am a mom, and I work full time. THEN do this. I do not have a studio. To be honest, it is easier for me to not have to order prints. I’ve done that before. This makes them happier, and me as well. This isn’t my full income, I’m not looking to make a living. I do it because I love it, and I want people to get something better than going to a cookie cutter studio. This doesn’t make me a faux. Yes I am saving up for better camera and lenses. It will come in time. The photosessions are for that.”

    The prints were an example of the mindset of a fauxtographer. This entire statement proves my point.  You also state on your FB page. That you would love to do this full time. I am not knocking your photography. I actually think overall you have potential, my point is that as long as you have the mindset that you do you will never be able to make a full time living at this. It has nothing to do with the prints or not. That was an example showing your mindset in your own words. That is what seperate photographers from fauxtographers.  Read my post about the 99.9% and it may explain it more.

    #4021
    creyes8519
    Member

    I totally understand now.  You definitely have a camera with low ISO performance.  I know plenty of photographers who use entry-level DSLRs and do just fine with it and take awesome photos for their clients.  Shit, I’ve seen photographers shoot high fashion shots with a disposable camera.  The camera does not make the photographer.  You just need to know your limitations.  I use a prime lens, I try and get as much light as possible indoors, I use a tripod if I have to, and occassionally I’ll use an external flash for bounce if the room is a little too dark.  For you, I would definitely avoid using ISO settings any higher than 400 and work around it.   Outdoors during the day obviously won’t be a problem, but indoors you definitely have to play around with light and your camera settings.

    Your photography is just fine, but keep it simple with the editing.   Your fall photoshoot is a good example of where I personally would not have used that editing style.  It’s not bad, and some clients may find it appealing, but to me it just takes away detail and most importantly, it takes away from the beautiful fall colors that should show through.

    Also…  I understand your reasoning for not giving clients prints.  Like I said, it is YOUR business and I am not here to tell you to run it.  The photographer who shot my homebirth did just that.  She gave me a disc of high-res photos.  Photos were great.  She is far from a fauxtographer.

    #4034
    IHF
    Member

    You’re  either in business to make money or you’re not.  You are pretending to be, and your prices and the way you practice reflect that.  That screams faux to me regardless of photo quality.

    To me it seems like you are offering affordable prices that are appropriate for your level of skill, experience, and resources.”

    You don’t charge according to skill level…..*shakes head* This is such bad advice

    If you really want to be serious and you really would like to maybe some day do this full time and make a living, here are just a few links that share my view on things (if you want more info on the business end of things, I will be happy to share more links with you.  Just ask)

    http://www.takeoffyourmommygoggles.com/consumers/what-is-a-fauxtographer-2/

    http://www.mcpactions.com/blog/2009/10/12/how-should-i-price-my-photography-words-of-advice-from-jodie-otte/

    http://currentphotographer.com/understanding-the-art-of-pricing-your-photography-by-deborah-kaufman/

     

    If you are happy with what you are doing, happy with just pretending, then I’m sorry you are also going to have to be happy with your fauxtographer label, because you are one.

    #4040
    IHF
    Member

    I’m also curious if you have ever finished any of your work, and if you understand what goes into printing and preparing your images for print?

     

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