Home Forums Main YANAP Discussion Forum This, that, and automatic modes Reply To: This, that, and automatic modes

#6747
KeyAndFill
Member

The Histogram tells me the dynamic range data of my shot and indicates whether I have my highlights or shadows properly exposed. By observing whether it is slanted to the left or the right,  I can tell whether my exposure has been weighted towards the highlights or the shadows, and I can then adjust it either by switching over to manual or using the exposure compensation dial to fine tune the image.

Egglington for the win!  One other thing to mention.  We all use EV to “adjust” our shutter or aperture to get the “correct” exposure (and I’m guilty too.)  If anyone has read any about Exposure Value – it was created, primarily, for use in Shutter priority or Aperture priority.  Lets say you take a photo of a kid playing in the water and you are shooting in Aperture Priority, you press the shutter release, review the image, and determine (by whatever means necessary) that it is either under exposed or over exposed.  Bollocks!  You really want to use that shallow depth of field, but the glare on the water is just too bright (because you exposed for the kid’s shadowed face.)  You use the EV button to change your Exposure Value so that your camera knows you either want to open up, or close down one stop, or more. At least that is how I understand it’s function, and what I would use it for.

One more item to close on.  Ask yourself one important question.  What is correct exposure?  CameraClicker and I are in a church  photographing the architecture.  A lady comes in, chooses a pew, and kneels to converse with her God.  CC and I both notice the window high above the lady and the beautiful light spilling directly on top of her.   Standing shoulder to shoulder, with identical cameras and lenses we compose, expose, and go home.  In looking at our photos I see that the light is illuminating our subject, the pew, and there is lots of detail in the photo, you can even see the tiny mouse in the corner, watching all of us.  Exactly what he wanted, perfect exposure!  We look at my photo, same composition, same focal length.  Our subject is illuminated by the window, but then light falls off from there.  A good portion of detail in the rest of the frame is either very dark or lost to the shadow.  Exactly what I wanted, perfect exposure!